How ‘The Kardashians’ is compared to ‘Keeping Up With the Kardashians’

Hulus’ “The Kardashians” has no pressure to “Keep Up” with his famous family, and that’s a good thing.

“The Kardashians” already made history on Hulu because of the unprecedented mega-deal for the Kardashian-Jenner family. But what has “The Kardashians” like its predecessor, the iconic “Keeping Up With the Kardashians”, not had?

After watching the first episode, which started streaming on Thursday, the missing puzzle piece seems to be that the famous reality TV family is being treated like your average (“average”) documentary topics. Unlike “KUWTK,” “The Kardashians” is not a sometimes-conservative PR attempt to capture headlines with “serious conversations” sprinkled between commercials. On the contrary, this family does not openly run a story; they are just being.

This is not to say that there are no instant moments that make headlines: Kim Kardashian’s sextape scandal is featured in the premiere, as well as her “Saturday Night Live” host debut. Kylie Jenner’s second pregnancy is fully shown, and Kourtney Kardashian and Travis Barker’s love story is captured by the cameras. But there’s an inherent comfort with “The Kardashians,” and we get the feeling that the titular family wants Hulu to really be a part of their world. There is no need to waste time on intros. The first paragraph is at once familiar and fresh: We know those, they know us, and the fourth wall be cursed.

That we look into their lives is not voyeuristic, but simply acknowledged: Even Kim’s eldest son Saint West knocks playfully on the camera lens. The audience is an honored guest at their table, and Kim is happy to talk to us directly over her kitchen sink while she loads up on fried chicken (she’s only vegan “sometimes,” joked the KKW Beauty founder).

For “KUWTK” towards the end, it felt as if the cameras were an unwanted hassle, awkward an object that drew into private moments. “The Kardashians” and its famous family now suddenly feel lighter. Of course, Khloé Kardashian and Tristan Thompson’s ongoing relationship still has its rocking effect, and Scott Disick is the future “brother” of the family, while thinking about ex Kourtney’s budding romance with now-engaged Travis. A network change does not mean that Kardashian-Jenners will change who they are; it just means we see who they are now trying to be in a different light.

As executive producer Ben Winston told Variety, the series is not about the Kardashians as a brand, but rather about “six billionaire businesswomen” sisters. “You have to step out of the Kardashian brand to look at it and say, ‘Well, that’s incredible.’ It’s a documentary in itself,” Winston said. “And then when you find out, that it’s Kardashians, then you look at it a little differently. “

How is Hulus’ “The Kardashians” different from E!’S “Keeping Up With the Kardashians”? Well, it all starts with the intro …

1. “The Kardashians” is a great thing, and we all know it

“Kardashians”

HULU

It’s easy to think of the famous “look at all my shittt” scenes from “Spring Breakers,” but yes, that’s really how Kardashian-Jenner’s lives. The opening scenes of “The Kardashians” introduce us not only to where the iconic family is geographically located now – they are all shown in their respective houses, not stuffed around a kitchen table and crunching on vegan salads – but also their respected independence from each other. Kourtney and Travis slip outside; across the rolling hills of Southern California, Kylie and matriarch Kris Jenner run Kylie Cosmetics from their office headquarters; further into the valley, Kim hurries from a SKIMS photo shoot to prepare for a kid-friendly home party; and Kendall Jenner beats Tibetan singing bowls in her backyard.

It’s all shown via several drone shots reminiscent of California Adventures ‘Soarin’ trip. (Hey, that might be a deep cut, but it’s on the mark for the newly Disney-owned franchise). The audience recognizes the Kardashians as much as they are the Calabasas. It’s all Bentleys, Balenciaga and Birkins for the Kardashians, but would we like it any other way?

2. “Premium” content comes with an (equal) price

Kardashians -

“Kardashians”

HULU

Executive producer Ben Winston previously told Variety that “The Kardashians” is taking a “if it’s not broken, do not repair it” to recreate what “KUWTK” built. Still, the new “premium” quality of “The Kardashians” is undeniable, beyond just the expensive drone footage and top-quality cameras. And “The Kardashians” literally do break down its predecessor: The family poses behind glass shattered to reveal the title of the show. And the crushing talk of going behind the mirror of Instagram personas, disrupting the reality TV landscape and breaking into the next generation of media consumption.

“The Kardashians” revel in its accessible luxury – we have access to their luxury – but Kim and Kris remind viewers that it’s about working hard to get what you want. The two leading ladies have built this empire together, and “The Kardashians” do not take it for granted. It is rather a celebration of that success and to take a respite after it.

Each sister has also adapted to life away from the cameras differently, as Kourtney shares that it was an “absolute dream” just to let her life “unfold” away from the limelight. And all Kardashian-Jenner women get equal pay this time.

“It’s fun to start with a clean slate,” Kim also tells the camera, with her confession being the main framework for the series so far. “I feel like we’ve had so much free time filming that we’ve kind of gone into our own worlds and done our own thing.”

A “more intimate” look behind the curtain (and under SKIMS bodysuits)

Kardashians -

“Kardashians”

HULU

It is not surprising that it is Kim and Kourtney with the most updates in the premiere episode. Kim jokes that her big moment that day was cleaning out her children’s playroom and saying, “That kind of thing makes me horny … Any mom would get that. If you have a clean playroom, my God, then you can sleep in the night.”

Khloé comments on Kim’s SKIMS bodysuit at a later date and tells her sister over lunch that there should be more fabric in the vagina area. Are you criticizing a Kardashian family product? It feels like a big no-no for “KUWTK”, where branding and product placement were felt in the forefront. At the end of the day, we’re still talking about SKIMS, for better or worse, but it’s the relativity (how many other SKIMS customers have had it the same way ?!) that makes “The Kardashians” look like to be a natural wink to the audience.

The editing of the show sets up jokes that cut between footage and confessions in a more effortless way instead of what felt like “serious conversation” to the confessional monologue on E! show. Even Kris’ longtime girlfriend Corey Gamble states that the cameras around them make him feel like it’s “season 92” where they’re on TV.

Showrunner Danielle King has emphasized a “cinematic” style for the series and calls for breaking the fourth way of further engaging the audience for an “intimate” look at their lives. Well, mission accomplished.

4. “This is my chance to do something on my own”

Kardashians -

“Kardashians”

HULU

The parallels are not lost on viewers as Kim struggles to ask the estranged man Kanye West to be the musical guest for her “SNL” episode (Halsey eventually appeared instead). Kim goes back and forth over whether she should take the plunge and have total ownership of her moment, or whether her co-parenting relationship with the visionary rapper is the perfect familiar consolation she needs. Kim knows she can not sing, can not dance, can not act and can not accents (her words), and noted that she feels that she has constantly “fulfilled the dreams of others” throughout her career, namely her mother Kris ‘goal for her. (See: the “Dancing With the Stars” contest that Kim “sucked” for).

“This is my chance to do something on my own,” Kim repeats in the first paragraph, reminding herself of that. Celebrity friend Chrissy Teigen leaves a voice memo, which Kim plays on camera, and congratulates her on the opportunity. Amy Schumer apparently even offered to help write jokes for Kim’s opening monologue, and Sarah Silverman came up with sketch ideas that involved Kanye if Kim wanted. Even Kim’s now boyfriend, “SNL” breakaway Pete Davidson, comforted her at the MET gala, where they first, yes, really met. “If you can read cue cards, then you’re fine,” Kim remembers Pete telling her.

And thankfully, there’s no requested signal card in sight for “The Kardashians.” It’s effortless, complete family – on their terms.

Sign up: Stay on top of the latest groundbreaking movie and TV news! Sign up for our email newsletters here.

Leave a Comment