Fantastic video shows how squid change color to camouflage themselves from predators

You must squid me! Great video showing squid changing COLOR to camouflage themselves from predators for the first time – just like squid

  • Many squid, including squid and squid, use camouflage
  • This led researchers to question whether squid also show this ability
  • While cleaning their tank, the team observed the squid changing colors
  • When they were over algae, the squid looked dark green, but when they were towards the clean tank, they switched to a lighter shade

From chameleons to squid, many animals are famous for their use of camouflage to hide from predators.

Now, squid have been captured on camera using the same techniques for the first time.

Researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University discovered a species of oval squid that changed color to blend in with its background when it sensed that a predator might be nearby.

‘This effect is really striking. I’m still surprised that no one has noticed this ability before us, “said Dr. Zdenek Lajbner, lead author of the study.

‘It shows how little we know about these wonderful animals.’

Researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University discovered a species of oval squid that changed color to blend in with its background when it sensed that a predator might be nearby

Camouflage in the animal kingdom

Many animals have developed methods of camouflage, making it difficult for predators (or prey) to spot them.

A common example is the snow shohar, which is a brilliant white color that fits into its snow-covered surroundings. The animal has the remarkable ability to develop a differently colored coat in the summer so that it fits into the changing terrain.

Stick insects developed another method and changed their shape to resemble their habitat – twigs.

Octopuses can change both their color and texture to blend in with the ocean floor and rock outcrops.

Predators have also come on the scene, with stripes of a tiger and the sandy hues of a lion helping them mingle with forest and grasslands, respectively.

Many squid, including squid and squid, use camouflage, prompting researchers to question whether squid also show this ability.

“Octopuses usually hover in the open ocean, but we would find out what happens when they move a little closer to a coral reef, or if they are chased by a predator to the ocean floor,” Dr. Ryuta Nakajima, one of the leaders. researchers.

Since 2017, researchers have grown a species of oval squid known locally as Shiro-ika at their research facility in Okinawa.

While cleaning their tank to remove algae, the researchers accidentally observed that the squid changed color.

When they were over the algae, the squid looked dark green, but when they were towards the clean tank, they switched to a lighter shade.

After their first observation, the researchers performed a controlled experiment to verify their results.

Several squid were kept in a tank while half were cleaned and the other half were left covered in algae.

An underwater camera was placed inside the tank while a regular camera was hung over it so they could film the animals from two angles.

The recordings confirmed their first observations – when the squid were on the clean side, they were a light color, but quickly darkened when above the algae.

While cleaning their tank to remove algae, the researchers accidentally observed that the squid changed color

While cleaning their tank to remove algae, the researchers accidentally observed that the squid changed color

When they were over the algae, the squid looked dark green, but when they were towards the clean tank, they switched to a lighter shade

When they were over the algae, the squid looked dark green, but when they were towards the clean tank, they switched to a lighter shade

Although the results are exciting, as they mark the first time squid have been seen camouflaged, they could also have important consequences for coral reefs, according to the researchers.

“If substrate is important for squid to avoid predation, then it indicates that increases or decreases in squid populations are even more linked to coral reef health than we thought,” explained Dr. Nakajima.

The team now hopes to study squid further to understand more about their camouflage abilities.

Professor Jonathan Miller, senior author of the study, concluded: “We look forward to continuing to explore the camouflage capabilities of this species and squid more generally.”

CAMOUFLAGE TECHNIQUES USE BOTH PLANTS AND ANIMALS

Plants may seem passive, but they camouflage themselves like animals, research has revealed.

Blending in the background helps the plants protect themselves from predators and has the same benefits as the technique does for animals.

They use various cunning techniques, including making themselves look as unimportant objects such as stones.

Background match – this involves mixing with the colors of shapes in the habitat where they live.

Disturbing staining markings that create the appearance of false edges and borders, making it harder to see the true contour.

Masked – looks like something else; usually something a predator can ignore, such as a rock or twig.

Examples include live stones, some cacti, passion vines and mistletoe.

Decoration accumulation of material from the environment.

For example, some coastal and dune plants are covered in sand due to their sticky glands, making them less conspicuous for shapes in the habitat in which they live.

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